Raspberry Ice Cream, Two Ways

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raspberries

raspberries in cream Raspberry Ice Cream, Two Ways

I’ve been scooping up berries with every visit to the market. (See here and here. Every morning they stain my white ceramic bowl shades of watercolor purple.) Normally I eat them barely adulterated–chilled cherries by the handful. But it’s nearly the end of July, and I haven’t sampled nearly enough ice cream this summer, and my machine was collecting dust. (I was relying on lazy woman’s ice cream.)

I tested two methods of raspberry ice cream-making. In the end, I decided to post both, because I couldn’t decide which I liked better. They’re just different. I offer my tasting notes below, but honestly, I found them both delicious. I hope you will too!

If you don’t have fruit brandy, you can substitute vodka. The idea is that the ice cream won’t freeze so solidly.

Raspberry ice cream base Raspberry Ice Cream, Two Ways Raspberry Ice Cream, Two Ways

This classic, crème anglaise-based ice cream is lighter in color, and is a little softer and more scoopable right out of the freezer. It’s more roundly creamy, and less bright-raspberry forward. It has a more complex flavor, and more of a dairy finish.

Makes about 1.5 pints

  • ingredients, version 1:
  • 1 1/4 cups whole milk
  • 1 3/4 cups cream
  • 1/2 cup skim milk powder
  • 1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 4 egg yolks
  • 2 cups (250 grams) raspberries
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon fruit brandy

  • procedure, version 1:
  •      In a medium pot, whisk together the milk, cream, milk powder and 1/2 cup of the sugar. Bring the mixture to a simmer, and then turn off the heat.
  •      Meanwhile, in a separate small bowl, whisk together the egg yolks with the remaining 2 tablespoons sugar. Beat energetically for 1 minute, until the color of the yolk lightens noticeably, and then slowly pour the milk/cream mixture over the yolks–at first drip by drip–whisking constantly until incorporated. Pour the mixture back into the pot: heat over medium-low, stirring occasionally until the base starts to thicken. (You are looking for 175F/80C on a candy thermometer, or until it sticks to the back of a spoon.)
  •      Add the raspberries to the ice cream base. Blend with an immersion blender for 30 seconds. Allow the warm base to sit for 30 minutes. After that, run it through a sieve, to remove the raspberry seeds and any unincorporated egg bits. Allow the base to sit overnight in the fridge. (This “aging” is said to improve the quality of the final product–a slightly fluffier ice cream, a slightly intensified flavor. These results are negligible-ish. The really important thing is to get the ice cream base very, very cold, which chilling overnight ensures. If you are short on time, chill at least 4 hours.)
  •      When the ice cream base is cold, mix it again with an immersion blender, 3 minutes. Then, pour the custard base into an ice cream maker. Let the machine run based on the manufacturer’s instructions, about 20-25 minutes, or until the ice cream reaches the consistency of soft-serve. Spoon the ice cream into a container, and then freeze for at least 3-4 hours. Take the ice cream out of the freezer 5-10 minutes before serving.

Raspberry Ice Cream, Two Ways

I got the idea to use gelatin from Christina Tosi via Leite’s Culinaria. I thought it might be “easier” than making a traditional ice cream. This eggless version is brighter in color, and has a more fruit-forward flavor, putting me in mind of sherbet. It’s still creamy though, and melts creamy on the tongue. It has a straightforward raspberry finish.

Makes about 1.5 pints

  • ingredients, version 2:
  • 1/4 heaping teaspoon powdered gelatin
  • 1 1/4 cups whole milk
  • 1 3/4 cups cream
  • 1/2 cup skim milk powder
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon fruit brandy
  • 2 cups (250 grams) raspberries

  • procedure, version 2:
  •      Pour the powdered gelatin into a small bowl. Add 1 teaspoon water to the bowl; give it a quick stir to distribute the gelatin in the water. Leave the bowl alone for 5 minutes.
  •      In a medium bowl, whisk together the milk, cream, milk powder and sugar. Spoon a couple tablespoons of the milk mixture into a separate small bowl; microwave for 10 seconds, just until slightly warm. By this point, the powdered gelatin should have absorbed all the water. (It will be the color of champagne, and a soft solid.) Whisk the warmed milk into the gelatin, until the milk mixture is smooth. Whisk the vanilla and the brandy into the mix.
  •      Add the raspberries to the bowl. Blend with an immersion blender for 30 seconds. After that, run the base through a sieve, to remove the raspberry seeds. Move the ice cream base to the fridge for a few hours, or overnight–you want it as cold as possible.
  •      Pour the ice cream base into an ice cream maker. Let the machine run based on the manufacturer’s instructions, about 20-25 minutes, or until the ice cream reaches the consistency of soft-serve. Spoon the ice cream into a container, and then freeze for at least 2-3 hours. Take the ice cream out of the freezer 5-10 minutes before serving.

Raspberry Ice Cream, Two Ways Raspberry Ice Cream, Two Ways

Raspberry Ice Cream, Two Ways Raspberry Ice Cream, Two Ways

Raspberry Ice Cream, Two Ways

5 Comments

  1. Heather

    These pictures are stunning! Both ice creams are such gorgeous shades of pink!

  2. I absolutely loooooove raspberry ice cream. It is by far my favorite ice cream flavor (other than chocolate, I mean c’mon). I am aching to make some ice cream before the summer is done! This looks heavenly. What kind of ice cream maker do you use? I want to buy one and I would love a tip!

  3. devangi

    Looks so good! I love raspberry flavored ice cream with a drizzle of hot fudge. Yum!

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